All recruitment, all online, all the time…

June 8th, 2017 | Industry News

The latest research into online recruitment predicts market trends and forecasts up to 2021 and focuses on global-level industry players as well as offering a historic analysis for many markets. What is clear from the report is that online recruitment systems are going to feature heavily in everybody’s futures, from temporary and contract staff through to fast-track career heavyweights.

The recruiting platform of the future is online

What else do we know about the future of recruiting? Well, the global market is expected to exceed £29 billion by 2021, growing from around £21 billion in 2016. We know that major growth sectors are likely to be IT (and especially AI), logistics and security – no surprise about any of those, with the UK’s Brexit vote potentially giving rise to a series of similar referendums around the world.

It’s also clear that any agency’s recruitment software database is likely to find itself subject to more stringent controls, specifically around data protection but also very possibly related to new legislation that may arise to track the movements of individuals who could be considered a risk to security.

Cloud recruitment software is increasingly used by both recruitment agencies and medium to large businesses. Bespoke software may give way to standardised systems that can be scaled and updated by the supplier to ensure that compliance with legislation is maintained and to give consumer confidence in data confidentiality.

The future’s bright – the future’s Google?

Google for Jobs is just around the corner. Tech experts have been watching the development of live user testing for a system that will join Facebook and well-established LinkedIn to offer a different kind of job search facility.

Will we all start looking for jobs on Google? Probably not, for several reasons:

  • Not all software as a service (aka SAAS recruitment software) is created equal – many users will feel unwilling to put their personal data into Google for fear of how it may be used by Google or hacked by others.
  • Professional careers may require specialist recruitment software solutions – a driver or chef might be able to find a good job through a generic search engine but it’s unlikely a forensic scientist or translator, a coder or a costumier will find their needs can be met by a ‘one size fits all’ recruitment database.
  • Google’s schema are likely to be swift, but blunt. While they may factor in such things as commuting time, they are unlikely to offer the sophisticated applicant tracking software systems that professional recruiters rely on to ensure swift, accurate and personalised communication with clients.

Overall we can say that while online recruitment is a growing feature of the global recruitment market, recruitment software will need to keep pace with both national legislation and the increasing demands that cloud recruitment software, like all kinds of cloud computing, be completely secure.